Tom Hollander height - How tall is Tom Hollander?

Tom Hollander (Thomas Anthony Hollander) was born on 25 August, 1967 in Bristol, United Kingdom, is a British actor. At 53 years old, Tom Hollander height is 5 ft 4 in (165.0 cm).

Now We discover Tom Hollander's Biography, Age, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is He in this year and how He spends money? Also learn how He earned most of net worth at the age of 53 years old?

Popular As Thomas Anthony Hollander
Occupation Actor
Age 53 years old
Zodiac Sign Virgo
Born 25 August 1967
Birthday 25 August
Birthplace Bristol, United Kingdom
Nationality United Kingdom

We recommend you to check the complete list of Famous People born on 25 August. He is a member of famous Actor with the age 53 years old group.

Tom Hollander Weight & Measurements

Physical Status
Weight Not Available
Body Measurements Not Available
Eye Color Not Available
Hair Color Not Available

Dating & Relationship status

He is currently single. He is not dating anyone. We don't have much information about He's past relationship and any previous engaged. According to our Database, He has no children.

Family
Parents Not Available
Wife Not Available
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Children Not Available

Tom Hollander Net Worth

He net worth has been growing significantly in 2018-19. So, how much is Tom Hollander worth at the age of 53 years old? Tom Hollander’s income source is mostly from being a successful Actor. He is from United Kingdom. We have estimated Tom Hollander's net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2020 $1 Million - $5 Million
Salary in 2019 Under Review
Net Worth in 2019 Pending
Salary in 2019 Under Review
House Not Available
Cars Not Available
Source of Income Actor

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Timeline

2019

At the 2019 general election he campaigned in Kensington for Sam Gyimah of the Liberal Democrats, saying "All the tactical voting sites as of the last few days are saying – confirming – that the Lib Dems are the party to vote for in Kensington if you want to stop a Tory winning here". Conservative candidate Felicity Buchan won the seat, previously held by the Labour Party; Gyimah came third, with 21% of the vote.

2018

Hollander played Queen's second manager Jim Beach in the biopic Bohemian Rhapsody, which was released in November 2018. Upon the firing of director Bryan Singer from the film in December 2017, it was reported Hollander very nearly quit the film due to issues with Singer, but was ultimately convinced to see it through. Also in 2018, Hollander played Tabaqui, a hyena in Andy Serkis' motion capture film Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle.

In 2010, Hollander returned to the live stage in a demanding comedic dual role in Georges Feydeau's A Flea in Her Ear at the Old Vic. Playing both master and servant with "lightning physical precision and shockingly true confusion", Hollander's was called "a virtuoso performance". Between September and November 2016 he starred as (a "career-best") Henry Carr in Patrick Marber's "superb revival" of Tom Stoppard's Travesties at the Menier Chocolate Factory. The play (with the same cast) transferred to the Apollo Theatre in February 2017 and was nominated for five Olivier Awards including Best Actor (Hollander) and Best Revival (Travesties). Marber's revival transferred to Broadway in 2018, with Hollander reprising his leading role as Carr. The play opened on 24 April 2018 (previews 29 March) at the Roundabout Theatre Company's American Airlines Theater in New York. Hollander received a Tony Award nomination for the production.

2017

He appeared as Henry Carr in a revival of Tom Stoppard's play Travesties at the Menier Chocolate Factory directed by Patrick Marber, later transferring to the Apollo Theatre in London on the West End and to the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway. Hollander was nominated for an Olivier Award for Best Actor and Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for his role in Travesties. Hollander appears as Dr. Sorgh in the film Tulip Fever which was released in September 2017. The screenplay, also by Stoppard, is an adaptation of Deborah Moggach's historical novel. He also appears as Garin in Terry George's historical drama The Promise, his third collaboration with George, who also directed him in Some Mother's Son and Whole Lotta Sole.

2016

In January 2016, he became an Honorary Fellow of Selwyn College, Cambridge (his former college).

2014

Hollander is a patron of the British Independent Film Awards and has supported the efforts of the Old Vic's "24 Hour Plays New Voices" Gala, which forwards the cause of young writers for the British stage. In August 2014, he was one of 200 public figures who were signatories to a letter to The Guardian opposing Scottish independence in the run-up to September's referendum on that issue.

2013

Hollander was born in Bristol, the son of teachers, and was raised in Oxford. Hollander's father is a Czech Jew, whose family converted to Catholicism, his mother an English Christian. He was brought up Christian. The family background was academic and musical – his grandfather, Hans Hollander, was a musicologist who wrote books about the composer Janáček. Hollander's parents were teachers, his father running the science department at a prestigious school in Oxford. He attended the Dragon School and then Abingdon School, where he was chief chorister. As a youngster, he was a member of the National Youth Theatre and the National Youth Music Theatre (then known as the Children's Music Theatre). In 1981, at the age of 14, he won the lead role in a BBC dramatisation of Leon Garfield's John Diamond.

2010

In 2010, Hollander and writer James Wood co-created the TV series Rev., a sensitive comedy about the all-too-human vicar of an inner-city parish. Reviews called it intelligent, realistic and very funny. Hollander played the sympathetic title character, Rev. Adam Smallbone. The show won a BAFTA in 2011 for Best Situation Comedy, among other awards and recognition. A second series aired in the UK on BBC 2 in 2011 and a third series in 2014. He has been praised for his role as the "inebriated and endearing, menacing and beguiling" chemist, Dr George Cholmondeley, appearing in five episodes of the BBC / FX 2017 series Taboo with one commenter describing him as "giving a masterclass on how to create dimension and personality, even with limited screen time."

2009

In 2009, Hollander played a symphonic cellist in Joe Wright's movie The Soloist, his second film with Wright, who cast him to great effect as the fevered suitor Mr. Collins in 2005's Pride and Prejudice. He has worked once more with Wright, portraying a memorably flamboyant and menacing villain in Hanna (2011). Hollander appeared in a lead role in Armando Iannucci's In the Loop as Secretary of State for International Development Simon Foster MP. Hollander later made a surprise appearance (in a different role) at the end of the third series of The Thick of It, the programme on which In the Loop was based.

2008

Since 2008, he has written an occasional diary-style column for The Spectator.

2007

Hollander portrayed Lord Cutler Beckett, the "heavy" in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End. He also appeared in the TNT miniseries The Company as Kim Philby, having previously played Guy Burgess in the BBC's Cambridge Spies. He returned to the stage in 2007 with the premiere of Joe Penhall's play Landscape with Weapon at the Royal National Theatre. In 2008 he made a notable cameo appearance as King George III in the HBO mini-series John Adams, and ended the year as a memorable Colonel Heinz Brandt in Valkyrie.

2006

Hollander has contributed his running and cycling efforts to several charitable causes, including running to raise funds for the Childline Crisis Hotline in 2006 and in 2007, for the Teenage Cancer Trust. He is a long-time supporter of the Helen & Douglas House Hospice for Children and Young Adults in Oxford, which provides hospice care for children. He continues to support charitable organisations by contributing readings and other appearances throughout the year.

2004

Hollander has lent his voice to a number of roles for BBC radio including Mosca in 2004's Volpone for Radio 3, Frank Churchill in Jane Austen's Emma and as Mr Gently Benevolent in the pilot of the Dickensian parody Bleak Expectations for Radio 4, although he did not take part in the full series. He has voiced a young Joseph Merrick, the "Elephant Man", a disembodied head named Enzio in an urban gothic comedy and Leon Theremin, the Russian inventor famous for the electronic instrument that bears his name. He provided the vocal texture for Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange recently with a "smooth, almost lyrical, crisp voice" that accomplished the task of rendering the extensive and unique slang of the book instantly understandable to readers. More recent readings include The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling. In 2015 (repeated in April 2017) he played Patrick Moore in the BBC radio play Far Side of the Moore about the astronomer and his Sky at Night TV programme. In May 2016 he portrayed Geoff Cathcart in Andy Mulligan's four-part play School Drama on BBC Radio 4 which was chosen by The Guardian as that week's best radio and he narrated Peter Bradshaw's short story Reunion, broadcast on Radio 4 in October 2016. He has also portrayed the Russian artist Kazimir Malevich in Margy Kinmonth's documentary Revolution: New Art for a New World which was released in the UK and Ireland in November 2016.

1992

Hollander won the 1992 Ian Charleson Award for his performance as Witwoud in The Way of the World at the Lyric Hammersmith Theatre. He had been nominated and commended the previous year for his Celia in an all-male production of As You Like It for Cheek by Jowl and was again nominated and commended for his Khlestakov in The Government Inspector at the Almeida Theatre in 1997. He had also received a special commendation for his 1996 performance of the title role in Tartuffe at the Almeida Theatre. In all, Hollander has been the most frequent Ian Charleson Award honoree, with four appearances at the awards: one win, two commendations and one special commendation.

1967

Thomas Anthony Hollander (/ˈ h ɒ l ən d ər / ; born 25 August 1967) is an English actor. He began his career in theatre, winning the Ian Charleson Award in 1992 for his performance as Witwoud in The Way of the World at the Lyric Hammersmith Theatre. He is known for his role in About Time, and in films such as Pirates of the Caribbean and In the Loop and drama films such as Enigma, Pride & Prejudice, Gosford Park, and Hanna, additionally portraying George V in The Lost Prince and The King's Man. He co-wrote and played the lead role in the sitcom Rev., which won the British Academy Television Award for best sitcom in 2011. He also played the lead in the ITV's Doctor Thorne and won the BAFTA Television Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Major Lance "Corky" Corkoran in the BBC series The Night Manager.