Stephen McNeil height - How tall is Stephen McNeil?

Stephen McNeil was born on 10 November, 1964 in Bridgetown, Canada, is a Politician. At 56 years old, Stephen McNeil height is 6 ft 7 in (200.7 cm).

Now We discover Stephen McNeil's Biography, Age, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is He in this year and how He spends money? Also learn how He earned most of net worth at the age of 56 years old?

Popular As N/A
Occupation Politician
Age 56 years old
Zodiac Sign Scorpio
Born 10 November 1964
Birthday 10 November
Birthplace Bridgetown, Canada
Nationality Canada

We recommend you to check the complete list of Famous People born on 10 November. He is a member of famous Politician with the age 56 years old group.

Stephen McNeil Weight & Measurements

Physical Status
Weight Not Available
Body Measurements Not Available
Eye Color Not Available
Hair Color Not Available

Who Is Stephen McNeil's Wife?

His wife is Andrea McNeil

Family
Parents Not Available
Wife Andrea McNeil
Sibling Not Available
Children Colleen McNeil

Stephen McNeil Net Worth

He net worth has been growing significantly in 2018-19. So, how much is Stephen McNeil worth at the age of 56 years old? Stephen McNeil’s income source is mostly from being a successful Politician. He is from Canada. We have estimated Stephen McNeil's net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2020 $1 Million - $5 Million
Salary in 2019 Under Review
Net Worth in 2019 Pending
Salary in 2019 Under Review
House Not Available
Cars Not Available
Source of Income Politician

Stephen McNeil Social Network

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Timeline

2017

In the 2017 election, his party retained a reduced majority of 27 seats in the legislature.

2015

The third controversy stemmed from the McNeil government's April 2015 budget. The budget provided for the elimination of the crown agency Film and Creative Industries Nova Scotia, as well as an overhaul of the long-standing Nova Scotia Film Tax Credit. This move appeared to break a pre-election promise made by McNeil in October 2013, and resulted in an outpouring of protest from the creative community. Under political pressure, McNeil was forced to abandon the changes tabled in the budget. The Liberal government instead come up with a new incentive program for the film and television industry: the Nova Scotia Film Production Incentive Fund.

2013

In the 2013 election, his party won a majority government, defeating the NDP government of Darrell Dexter.

McNeil was sworn in as Premier of Nova Scotia, along with his cabinet by Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia John James Grant on October 22, 2013 in Annapolis Royal. This was the first time since 1954 that the swearing in ceremony has been held outside the provincial capital of Halifax. McNeil is leading the first Liberal government in Nova Scotia in 14 years after a majority win to take 33 of Nova Scotia's 51 provincial seats; during much of that time the Nova Scotia Liberal Party held third party status in the legislature.

The second controversial legislation was the Financial Measures Act, which eliminated the Graduate Retention Rebate – a tax rebate given to graduates who stayed in the province to work. The government said the program was not working and that student groups wanted it cut.

2009

In the 2009 election, McNeil led the Liberals to Official Opposition status, winning 11 seats.

2007

On January 30, 2007, McNeil announced he would run for leadership of the Liberal Party. He was endorsed by Leo Glavine, Harold Theriault, Wayne Gaudet, Robert Thibault, Rodger Cuzner, Jim Cowan, Don Downe and Dr. Jim Smith. On April 28, 2007 at the Liberal Leadership Convention in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, McNeil was elected leader on the second ballot over runner-up Diana Whalen.

1999

McNeil first sought election in 1999 but was defeated. During that election McNeil indicated in a questionnaire provided by the campaign life coalition that he was pro-life. In 2013 a spokesperson for McNeil said his views had evolved since 1999 and he was no longer pro-life. He ran again in 2003 and was elected to the Nova Scotia House of Assembly.

1994

The McNeil government's first session of the legislature lasted only 11 sitting days, the shortest fall sitting since fall sittings were made mandatory in 1994. The McNeil government was not required to hold a fall session of the legislature, as legislative sessions are not required for six months after an election. Campaign commitments by McNeil's Liberal government were met during the first session of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly, passing three significant pieces of legislation during this session. The first was a law meant to open the electricity market to more producers. Critics said this law would neither reduce power rates, nor break Nova Scotia Power's monopoly, while advocates said it would soon allow for renewable electricity companies to sell directly to consumers. Another piece of notable legislation was for a statutory holiday in February. Critics said this would hurt the small business community, while advocates said it would help families spend more time together. Another commitment met included legislation to make economic investments more transparent and accountable. Another piece of notable legislation was the Liberal government's commitment to ban the importation of fracking wastewater from other jurisdictions.

1988

McNeil was born in Bridgetown, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, the 12th of 17 children. His mother, Theresa McNeil, was the first female high sheriff in Canada and is a recipient of the Order of Nova Scotia. McNeil attended the Nova Scotia Community College, and owned a small business for 15 years between 1988 and 2003.

1964

Stephen McNeil MLA (born November 10, 1964) is a Canadian politician who is the 28th and current premier of Nova Scotia, having assumed office on October 22, 2013. He has also represented the riding of Annapolis in the Nova Scotia House of Assembly since 2003 and has been the leader of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party since 2007.